Congratulations to Criminal Justice Alum Ashley Farmer

Congratulations to Criminal Justice Alum Ashley Farmer

Ashley Farmer, a graduate of EKU’s Criminal Justice Masters Program, has been awarded a PhD from the University of Delaware.  Her dissertation, titled “Copwatchers: Citizen Journalism and the Changing Police-Community Dynamic” was the recipient of the University of Delaware’s Dan Rich Dissertation Award. It examined how high profile police-citizen encounters and technological advances allowing citizens to film and photograph the police have led to increased awareness of police use of force. This, paired with recently implemented body worn cameras, has highlighted the ways citizen journalism may shape public perceptions of police-community relations. As such, she explored the motivations and reasons why citizens record the police, law enforcement’s response to the public, and how “copwatching” can change the way police interact with communities, becoming more publicized and adversarial via citizens challenging authority.

Dr. Farmer also worked at the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delware, giving her the opportunity to further explore her interdisciplinary interests between criminology, disaster studies and the environment, and collective behavior. Most recently, she finished a paper on fear of crime in public shelters during hurricanes. She plans to continue this research in environmental issues as they relate to criminology, especially exploring wildlife crime.

In addition to research, Dr. Farmer has taught upper-level and introductory courses at UD, where she was given a teaching fellowship in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice and was also awarded the Department’s Scarpitti Award for Outstanding Graduate Student.        

Beginning in Fall 2016, Dr. Farmer will join the faculty in the Criminal Justice Sciences department at Illinois State University, where she will be teaching Policing and Research Methods courses.  There, she will continue her research on police-citizen encounters, police accountability, and how new technologies affect policing and communities.  

Published on July 05, 2016

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